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Louie Do Gee. Image from Open Air Archive by Angie Smith, an outdoor photography exhibition of the people of Boise, 1800s to today that was part of the public art featured at the 2019 Treefort Music Fest.

Louie Do Gee image at Hurless Brothers, Boise, Idaho, May 25, 2019.

Louie Do Gee first came to Idaho to work in the mining industry. After the mining industry crashed in the late 1800’s, he came to Boise and started gardening, as he had done in China before he immigrated. He leased land along the river from the Davis family in what is now called Garden City. Over time, he cultivated thriving gardens and delivered his fresh produce to neighborhoods throughout Boise by horse and wagon until he upgraded to a Model T. In the 1920’s Louie’s sons, William and Tong came to Idaho from China. Together, the operated Louie Gee Gardens until 1946 when the incorporation of Garden City forced them to give up the land they leased from the Davis Family. This photograph taken by Walter Lubken in 1926. Photo courtesy of the Idaho State Historic Society.

Angie Smith is a photographer and artist living in LA and Boise. She has worked as an editorial and commercial photographer for New York Times Magazine, the New Yorker, Time, and Oprah, and her installation, Stronger Shines the Light Inside, was recognized by the Obama Administration as one of the most impactful projects to integrate refugees in America. In March 2019, she returned to Idaho to conduct a portrait workshop with Boise’s refugee and immigrant communities. Using wheat paste, she installed these photographs, along with historic portraits, throughout the downtown area in celebration of the rich intersection of culture that is part of Boise’s past and present identity.

Louie Do Gee first came to Idaho to work in the mining industry. After the mining industry crashed in the late 1800’s, he came to Boise and started gardening, as he had done in China before he immigrated. He leased land along the river from th
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(C) 2019 Gregg Mizuta
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2141x1427 / 2.1MB
Gregg Mizuta
Contained in galleries
Angie Smith - Open Air Archives
Louie Do Gee. Image from Open Air Archive by Angie Smith, an outdoor photography exhibition of the people of Boise, 1800s to today that was part of the public art featured at the 2019 Treefort Music Fest. <br />
<br />
Louie Do Gee image at Hurless Brothers, Boise, Idaho, May 25, 2019.<br />
<br />
Louie Do Gee first came to Idaho to work in the mining industry. After the mining industry crashed in the late 1800’s, he came to Boise and started gardening, as he had done in China before he immigrated. He leased land along the river from the Davis family in what is now called Garden City. Over time, he cultivated thriving gardens and delivered his fresh produce to neighborhoods throughout Boise by horse and wagon until he upgraded to a Model T. In the 1920’s Louie’s sons, William and Tong came to Idaho from China. Together, the operated Louie Gee Gardens until 1946 when the incorporation of Garden City forced them to give up the land they leased from the Davis Family. This photograph taken by Walter Lubken in 1926. Photo courtesy of the Idaho State Historic Society.<br />
<br />
Angie Smith is a photographer and artist living in LA and Boise. She has worked as an editorial and commercial photographer for New York Times Magazine, the New Yorker, Time, and Oprah, and her installation, Stronger Shines the Light Inside, was recognized by the Obama Administration as one of the most impactful projects to integrate refugees in America. In March 2019, she returned to Idaho to conduct a portrait workshop with Boise’s refugee and immigrant communities. Using wheat paste, she installed these photographs, along with historic portraits, throughout the downtown area in celebration of the rich intersection of culture that is part of Boise’s past and present identity.<br />
<br />
Louie Do Gee first came to Idaho to work in the mining industry. After the mining industry crashed in the late 1800’s, he came to Boise and started gardening, as he had done in China before he immigrated. He leased land along the river from th